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Different Stages of Preparation that helps Everyone to Crack any GD Round

This is not a one day job, but a continuous process wherein an individual needs to pay attention and keep enhancing all of the above-mentioned skills. It is quite a holistic attempt and working at a single aspect will not yield the desired outcome. Nevertheless, there are a few things that one should keep in mind and these have been discussed.



While Preparing for the GD

One needs to work on the structuring of his/her thoughts. One structured line has more effect than ten ambiguous lines.

One needs to make reading his/her hobby. The more a person reads, the richer will be his/her knowledge bank. This will also enrich their vocabulary and would improve fluency in English. Find what works for an individual— newspapers, books, magazines, etc. For example, if lengthy reading is not one's thing, then he/she can pick up a book of short stories.

Another way to improve one's spoken language is to expose oneself to English more. Some of the ways to do it are to listen to daily news in English, read aloud whenever one is studying his or her textbooks, etc.

Sit in front of a mirror and observe own self while speaking on a topic — facial expressions, body language, voice. etc.

If an individual has willing friends/family members, get into a discussion with one and have the other make notes of the proceedings, and not participate at all. See how an individual responds to changes during the talk, and how the same get manifested by us. Many times, we are blind to our non-verbal behaviour, since we cannot see ourselves.

Practice and learn to pace one's articulation —a speaker should not be so slow that the listener loses interest, or so fast that no one can gather what you need to express.

On the day of the GD

Dress in comfortable, business formals.

Although it might be provided by the recruiter, keep the paper and pen handy.

Wear a watch so as to keep an eye on the time during the discussion.

Maintain a relaxed and confident posture from the start so that your mind also imitates it and avoids a case of butterflies in the stomach.

During the GD

An individual needs to pace his or her voice and its level in a way which is audible and easy to understand.

Every discussion has its ebbs and low. In case one is having a soft voice or is not able to make him or herself heard in the noise, keep a look for these low activity points and make the entry then.

While making a point, refrain from delving into too much detail on anything. This will attract midway interruption from other participants and the spoken point might not meet its mark.

In case the group is digressing from the topic or time allotted, politely point it out. But do not do too frequently.

Since the group discussion is carried out in English, comfort and fluency in this language is necessary. Try to remove the "ummm", connecting regional words and long pauses.

Keep your attention away from the moderator. A speaker's discussion is with the group and not with her/him; their role is that of an observer. This will also prevent a speaker from becoming a conscious and risking distraction. He/she may choose to interrupt the GD if the group is getting too noisy or straying away from the topic at hand.

One must keep an eye on his or her body language at all times; even when one is not speaking.

Following are some key postures for a good body language:

Never point a finger towards anybody.

Do not lean back. Sit straight and slightly inclined forward. This shows that a person wishes to be in this discussion. Remember not to slouch at any point.

Use hand gestures illustrating what you are saying, but do not overdo it. Keep it subtle and not too far from your body.

While quoting some other participant point him out with an open hand (not with one finger).

Do not fidget or tap your fingers on the table or armchair.

The body posture needs to be kept open and not something which conveys a closed person. Avoid negative postures, like crossing arms.

  1. Never point a finger towards anybody.

  2. Do not lean back. Sit straight and slightly inclined forward. This shows that a person wishes to be in this discussion. Remember not to slouch at any point.

  3. Use hand gestures illustrating what you are saying, but do not overdo it. Keep it subtle and not too far from your body.

  4. While quoting some other participant point him out with an open hand (not with one finger).

  5. Do not fidget or tap your fingers on the table or armchair.

  6. The body posture needs to be kept open and not something which conveys a closed person. Avoid negative postures, like crossing arms.

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